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A brand audit is a checkup that evaluates your brand’s position in the marketplace, its strengths and weaknesses, and how to strengthen it. A brand audit should cover three areas: Internal branding — your brand values, mission and company culture

In its simplest form, a brand name is a form of a signature that gives credit to the creator of a particular work or service and sets it apart from those created by others. Two of the main purposes of brand names are: Identification: To differentiate a particular product or service from other like or similar brands.

A brand slogan is the advertising tagline that conveys the brand’s spirit in the shortest way possible. In just a few words, you’re expected to grasp the vibe of your brand.

Brand architecture defines the role of each brand and acts as a guideline for the interrelationship between the brands in your organization. When thinking about adding a new brand or product, it is crucial to understand where it will sit within your organization.

Brand positioning strategy is about finding a right place for a brand in market place as well consumer mind. A consumer should easily identify that for a given need or want this is the brand. If brand fails to do this, it simply becomes just another product or commodity on supermarket or mall shelf.

Visual identity is a collection of visual elements that serve to represent and differentiate a brand. More specifically, it refers to any visible components such as a logo or brand colors that help customers identify a brand.

What is brand voice? Brand voice is the distinct personality a brand takes on in its communications. Imagine you went to a dinner party and you’re chatting with all the guests. One person stands out because they’re great at storytelling in a distinctive, unique way.

A brand mark is a symbol, element, art design, or visual image that helps immediately recognize a certain company. It is essential for developing and maintaining a brand’s image.

A brand consultant is an expert who helps companies define, sharpen, and grow their reputation over time – which makes the brand a more important driver of business performance.

Design _

Graphic design is the art, profession and academic discipline whose activity consists in projecting visual communications intended to transmit specific messages to social groups, with specific objectives. Therefore, it is an interdisciplinary branch of design whose foundations and objectives revolve around the definition of problems and the determination of objectives for decision-making, through creativity, innovation and lateral thinking along with digital tools, transforming them for proper interpretation. This activity helps in the optimization of graphic communications (see also communication design). It is also known as visual communication design, visual design or editorial design.

At the very basic level, logos are symbols made up of text and images that help us identify brands we like. But they can be so much more! A good logo is the cornerstone of your brand. It helps customers understand what you do, who you are and what you value. That’s a lot of responsibility on a tiny image! Here’s the definition of what a logo is and how to make the most of it. A logo is a symbol made up of text and images that identifies a business. A good logo shows what a company does and what the brand values. Logo design is all about creating the perfect visual brand mark for a company. Depending on the type, a logo usually consists of a symbol or brandmark and a logotype, along with a tagline.

Web design encompasses many different skills and disciplines in the production and maintenance of websites. The different areas of web design include web graphic design; user interface design (UI design); authoring, including standardised code and proprietary software; user experience design (UX design); and search engine optimization. Often many individuals will work in teams covering different aspects of the design process, although some designers will cover them all.[1] The term “web design” is normally used to describe the design process relating to the front-end (client side) design of a website including writing markup. Web design partially overlaps web engineering in the broader scope of web development. Web designers are expected to have an awareness of usability and if their role involves creating markup then they are also expected to be up to date with web accessibility guidelines.

Motion graphic design is a subset of graphic design in that it uses graphic design principles in a filmmaking or video production context (or other temporally evolving visual media) through the use of animation or filmic techniques. Examples include the kinetic typography and graphics used in film and television opening sequences, and the spinning, three-dimensional station identification logos of some television channels. The art form has been around for decades, and has advanced in technical sophistication over time. Motion graphic design is often used in the film industry. Openings to movies, television shows, and news programs can use photography, typography, and motion graphics to make the introduction Motion graphic design has also achieved widespread use in content marketing and advertising. With global technology firm Cisco projecting that 82 percent of all web traffic will be video by 2022, marketers and advertisers have focused much of their efforts on the production of high-quality branded video and motion graphic content. Motion graphics also can be used to create videos and cartoons. For example, you can use videos, photos, and text to create a video with a voice-over to sell a product. Also, animate a logo or text using motion design. Now everyone uses motion design to make it easier for the audience and interesting for them. Motion graphics is a power that will catch your eyes into it. Motion graphic uses a lot of different tools and techniques and a lot of skills.

Art director is the title for a variety of similar job functions in theater, advertising, marketing, publishing, fashion, film and television, the Internet, and video games. It is the charge of a sole art director to supervise and unify the vision of an artistic production. In particular, they are in charge of its overall visual appearance and how it communicates visually, stimulates moods, contrasts features, and psychologically appeals to a target audience. The art director makes decisions about visual elements, what artistic style(s) to use, and when to use motion. Despite the title, an advertising art director is not necessarily the head of an art department. In modern advertising practice, an art director typically works with a copywriter as a creative team. In advertising, an art director makes sure the client’s message is conveyed to their desired audience. They are responsible for the advertising’s visual aspects, while working with other team members such as the graphic designer. They work together to devise an overall concept (also known as the “creative” or “big idea”) for the commercial, mailer, brochure, or other advertisements. The copywriter is responsible for the textual content, the art director for the visual aspects. But the art director may come up with the headline or other copy, and the copywriter may suggest a visual or the aesthetic approach. Each usually welcomes suggestions and constructive criticism from the other, as such collaboration often improves the work.

Signage systems are visually oriented information systems, consisting of signs, maps, arrows, color-codings systems, pictograms and different typographic elements. Signage systems differ from other methods of information presentation because they are typically used to guide people’s passage through the physical world; road signs on a highway, station identification signs in a subway and overhead signs in an airport are all common examples of signage systems. The act of following a signage system is known as wayfinding, waysigning or signposting. While any collection of correlated signs can be considered a signage system, the term is typically used to refer to a group of signs with a coherent design and purpose. Frequently, significant effort is put into creating an intelligent presentation for a sign that takes into account scientific knowledge about humans’ reactive capabilities to typefaces and colors. This research has produced a design aesthetic of certain fonts that are frequently used (especially humanist sans-serif designs like Frutiger, which was created in 1969 for signage in Paris’ Charles de Gaulle Airport.) One of the most commonly cited examples of a well-designed signage system is the London Underground. The Underground’s station signs consist of a red roundel and a horizontal blue bar containing the station name. They are instantly recognizable to riders throughout London, are unlikely to be confused with other signage, and can be replicated throughout printed materials, stations, and street-level entrances to provide consistency throughout the entire system. The typeface used on the signs, New Johnston, was designed in 1913 specifically for the Underground to provide readability at a distance.

Packaging is the science, art and technology of enclosing or protecting products for distribution, storage, sale, and use. Packaging also refers to the process of designing, evaluating, and producing packages. Packaging can be described as a coordinated system of preparing goods for transport, warehousing, logistics, sale, and end use. Packaging contains, protects, preserves, transports, informs, and sells. In many countries it is fully integrated into government, business, institutional, industrial, and personal use. Package labeling (American English) or labelling (British English) is any written, electronic, or graphic communication on the package or on a separate but associated label.

Brand Guidelines (also commonly referred to as “brand standards”, “style guide” or “brand book”) are essentially a set of rules that explain how your brand works. These guidelines typically include basic information: An overview of your brand’s history, vision, personality and key values. Brand message or mission statement – including examples of ‘tone of voice’. Logo usage – where and how to use your logo including minimum sizes, spacing and what not to do with it. Colour palette – showing your primary and secondary colour palettes with colour breakdowns for print, screen and web. Type style – showing the specific font that you use and details of the font family and default fonts for web use. Image style/photography – examples of image style and photographs that work with the brand. Business card and letterhead design – examples of how the logo and font are used for standard company literature. If you’re just starting out and you only require a few key marketing tools at this point, focusing on the above areas may be enough. However, to make sure all your bases are covered, you may choose to go with a more detailed Brand Book that also includes: – Design layouts and grids – Social media profile page applications – Brochure/flyer layout options – Website layout – Signage specifications – Advertising treatments – Merchandising applications – Copywriting style (a.k.a. “tone of voice”) – Editorial guidelines Brand guidelines should be flexible enough for designers to be creative, but rigid enough to keep your brand easily recognizable. Consistency is key, especially if you need the brand to extend across multiple media platforms.

Identity – or visual identity, or visual identity system, or brand identity system – is a package of visual devices that an organization uses to communicate the brand, such as graphic imagery, a color system, fonts and yes, a logo. A visual identity system is the consistent use of logos, colors and typography. Over time, this visual identity — or “look” — becomes associated with the organization, and thereby reinforces its messages and personality. Visual brand Identity is the unique “system” of design elements – such as shape, color, materials, finish, typography and composition – which directly and subliminally communicate a company’s values and personality through compelling imagery and design style. This “System”, properly designed, results in an emotional connection between the brand and the consumer. Visual brand language is a key ingredient necessary to make an authentic and convincing brand strategy that can be applied uniquely and creatively in all forms of brand communications to both employees and customers. Successful Visual Brand Systems creates a memorable experience for the consumer, encouraging repeat business and boosting the company’s economic health. It is a long-term creative solution that can be leveraged by an executive team to showcase their brand’s unique personality.

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